se tituló como abogado (Corte Suprema de Chile, 1968)

inglés translation: was admitted to practise law by the Chilean Supreme Court (1968)

Entrada de glosario (tomada de la pregunta de abajo)
Término o frase en español: se tituló como abogado (Corte Suprema de Chile, 1968)
Traducción al inglés:was admitted to practise law by the Chilean Supreme Court (1968)
Aportado por: Elizabeth Medina

15:18 Jan 14, 2013
Traducciones de español a inglés [PRO]
Law/Patents - Educación / Pedagogía / Law degree in academic qualifications
Término o frase en español: se tituló como abogado (Corte Suprema de Chile, 1968)
This would be translated as "he received his law degree in..." but what throws me off is the reference to the Chilean Supreme Court. It seems to me that he passed his bar exams in 1968, but what does the Supreme Court have to do with that?

Any clarification will be much appreciated.

Rgds,
Elizabeth
Elizabeth Medina
Local time: 23:00
was admitted to practise law by the Chilean Supreme Court (1968)
Explicación:
I post this with some hesitation, since Taña has already cited this very phrase, but she has indicated that she prefers to leave her post as a reference. However, I am sure it's correct, and I feel that (if you agree) it ought to be put in the glossary, not least because every existing reference there to "título de abogado" equates it to a law degree, and that is not the case here, even if it is in other cases.

(By the way, it will be "practice law" in American English.)

Of course "título" often means a university degree, and "titularse" often means to graduate. But a "título de abogado" in Chile is a professional licence (license) to practise law, not a degree. The appropriate law degree, which you have to have before being granted the "título de abogado", is Licenciado en Ciencias Jurídicas (commonly known as Licenciado en Derecho), obtained from a university. To get the título you have to have one of these, and also fulfil certain other prerequisities: minimum age 20, no criminal record, certificate of good conduct, six months' probationary practice, Chilean nationality, or law studies in Chile if not Chilean.

The "título", as I say, is a professional licence. It would not be incorrect to say that this person was "granted the title of attorney/barrister", depending on whether the target is UK/Commonwealth or US; but "admission to practice law" is the standard expression for this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Admission_to_practice_law

The "Corte Suprema" part is actually a bit of a tautology, since the "título de abogado" in Chile is always granted by the Supreme Court, in public plenary session. Here's a statement on the subject from the FAQ on the Chilean Poder Judicial website:

"En el ordenamiento jurídico chileno, los abogados son conceptualizados como las personas revestidas por la autoridad competente, de la facultad de defender ante los Tribunales de Justicia los derechos de las partes litigantes, de conformidad a lo dispuesto en el artículo 520 de nuestro Código Orgánico de Tribunales.
El título de abogado es otorgado por la Corte Suprema, en audiencia pública y reunida en tribunal pleno, y previa comprobación y declaración, de que el postulante reúne los requisitos establecidos por la ley, que son los siguientes:"
http://www.pjud.cl/PDF/ATUsuarios/PreguntasFrecuentes/requis...

It goes on to set out the requisites (including the licenciatura degree) as summarised above.

Here's someone else who includes the Corte Suprema part in his CV:

"Grados y títulos académicos
Licenciatura en Derecho, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. 1994
Título de Abogado otorgado por la Corte Suprema de Justicia. 1998"
http://www.filosofiacristiana.cl/miembros/alvarado.html
Respuesta elegida de:

Charles Davis
España
Local time: 03:00
Grading comment
Thanks so much Charles, Taña, excellent clarification, most grateful.
4 puntos KudoZ otorgados a esta respuesta



Resumen de las respuestas recibidas
4 +1was admitted to practise law by the Chilean Supreme Court (1968)
Charles Davis
Summary of reference entries provided
Taña Dalglish

Entradas de discusión: 2





  

Respuestas


7 horas   Nivel de confianza: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 Coincidencias de otros usuarios (netas) +1
was admitted to practise law by the Chilean Supreme Court (1968)


Explicación:
I post this with some hesitation, since Taña has already cited this very phrase, but she has indicated that she prefers to leave her post as a reference. However, I am sure it's correct, and I feel that (if you agree) it ought to be put in the glossary, not least because every existing reference there to "título de abogado" equates it to a law degree, and that is not the case here, even if it is in other cases.

(By the way, it will be "practice law" in American English.)

Of course "título" often means a university degree, and "titularse" often means to graduate. But a "título de abogado" in Chile is a professional licence (license) to practise law, not a degree. The appropriate law degree, which you have to have before being granted the "título de abogado", is Licenciado en Ciencias Jurídicas (commonly known as Licenciado en Derecho), obtained from a university. To get the título you have to have one of these, and also fulfil certain other prerequisities: minimum age 20, no criminal record, certificate of good conduct, six months' probationary practice, Chilean nationality, or law studies in Chile if not Chilean.

The "título", as I say, is a professional licence. It would not be incorrect to say that this person was "granted the title of attorney/barrister", depending on whether the target is UK/Commonwealth or US; but "admission to practice law" is the standard expression for this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Admission_to_practice_law

The "Corte Suprema" part is actually a bit of a tautology, since the "título de abogado" in Chile is always granted by the Supreme Court, in public plenary session. Here's a statement on the subject from the FAQ on the Chilean Poder Judicial website:

"En el ordenamiento jurídico chileno, los abogados son conceptualizados como las personas revestidas por la autoridad competente, de la facultad de defender ante los Tribunales de Justicia los derechos de las partes litigantes, de conformidad a lo dispuesto en el artículo 520 de nuestro Código Orgánico de Tribunales.
El título de abogado es otorgado por la Corte Suprema, en audiencia pública y reunida en tribunal pleno, y previa comprobación y declaración, de que el postulante reúne los requisitos establecidos por la ley, que son los siguientes:"
http://www.pjud.cl/PDF/ATUsuarios/PreguntasFrecuentes/requis...

It goes on to set out the requisites (including the licenciatura degree) as summarised above.

Here's someone else who includes the Corte Suprema part in his CV:

"Grados y títulos académicos
Licenciatura en Derecho, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. 1994
Título de Abogado otorgado por la Corte Suprema de Justicia. 1998"
http://www.filosofiacristiana.cl/miembros/alvarado.html

Charles Davis
España
Local time: 03:00
Se especializa en este campo
Idioma materno: inglés
Pts. PRO en la categoría: 676
Grading comment
Thanks so much Charles, Taña, excellent clarification, most grateful.

Comentarios de otros usuarios sobre esta respuesta (y réplicas del usuario que envió la respuesta)
Coincido  Taña Dalglish: He ... he! Post away my friend! I certainly think that it is the meaning, but Phil does make a good point re the lack of clarity & your pt. re "Corte Suprema" being a bit of a tautology is valid.
5 minutos
  -> Very true. I imagine people mention it because it sounds rather grand. Anyway, I do think this has got to be right, and it's worth making the point about "título". Gracias, y un abrazo :)
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Reference comments


15 minutos Coincidencias de otros usuarios (netas) +3
Reference

Reference information:
Elizabeth:

I believe we need further context so that those who can help will have a clearer understanding.

However, see this link: (but I am guessing too!)
http://jointconference.law.cuhk.edu.hk/speakers.php
Professor Jaime Arancibia
Professor of Constitutional and Administrative Law at Universidad de los Andes (Chile)
In 1999, he received his LL.B, highest distinction, from UC Law School in Chile and ****was admitted to practice law by the Supreme Court.****

Taña Dalglish
Jamaica
Idioma materno: inglés
Pts. PRO en la categoría: 226

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
Coincido  Rosa Paredes: That's it. You should enter this as your answer ... (?)
4 horas
  -> Thanks Rosa. Appreciate it, but I will leave as a reference.
Coincido  philgoddard: This does seem the most likely answer.
5 horas
  -> Thanks.
Coincido  Charles Davis: Once again you have given the correct answer as a reference. I have taken it upon myself to document it and post it as an answer. I hope that's OK with you.
7 horas
  -> Absolutely! My initial thinking was that it was more reference worthy as opposed to glossary material! Thanks again.
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