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Corona quarantine diary
Autor de la hebra: Mervyn Henderson

Bernhard Sulzer  Identity Verified
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Local time: 13:00
Miembro 2006
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Some good stuff there, LT, some great stuff. Gonna recommend ya ... you're gonna be huge May 13

Mervyn Henderson wrote:


A man came on the line, very sharp and business-like:

“Am I right in assuming I’m speaking to Mr Little Translator in the Basque Country?”

“We-e-e-ell …”, I said cautiously, shooting a glance over to where Garmendia was laughing at a chair, “… not if this is the police, customs or tax office.”


Thanks for that Merv. Great stuff!


 

RobinB  Identity Verified
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Local time: 12:00
alemán al inglés
A very sobering assessment May 14

Far be it for me to rain on anybody's parade, but:

'It will be four or five years before Covid-19 is under control, the World Health Organization’s chief scientist predicted on Wednesday, in a bleak assessment of the difficulties that lie ahead.

Many factors will determine how long and to what extent the virus remains a threat, including whether it mutates, what containment measures are put in place and whether an effective vaccine is developed, Soumya Swaminathan tol
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Far be it for me to rain on anybody's parade, but:

'It will be four or five years before Covid-19 is under control, the World Health Organization’s chief scientist predicted on Wednesday, in a bleak assessment of the difficulties that lie ahead.

Many factors will determine how long and to what extent the virus remains a threat, including whether it mutates, what containment measures are put in place and whether an effective vaccine is developed, Soumya Swaminathan told the FT’s Global Boardroom digital conference.

“I would say in a four to five-year timeframe we could be looking at controlling this,” she said, adding there was “no crystal ball” and the pandemic could “potentially get worse”.

A vaccine “seems for now the best way out”, but there were “lots of ifs and buts” about its efficacy and safety, as well as its production and equitable distribution, she said. A vaccine could also stop working if the virus changed, she added.'

Read in conjunction with this:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-52643682

It doesn't mean we can't manage the virus, eventually, but it does mean we will have to take every measure possible to prevent it from spreading after lockdowns have been eased. It will only take a small number of people who refuse to wear masks in public or socially distance to trigger further local flare-ups. And it does mean we have to ignore happytalking politicians, everywhere.
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Jennifer Forbes
Michael Wetzel
expressisverbis
Kevin Fulton
 

Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
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Thursday 14 May May 14

Deaths are up slightly again, but considering all the recent frolicking around bars in our new-found quasi-freedom, now I’m focusing on new contagions, and they’re up by 400 or so. Don’t say I didn’t warn anybody. The police came across several groups of teenagers and their “botellón”, which just means the kids all go to the supermarket and each buy a bottle of rum or whiskey or something, along with some mixers, and then they all sit around on some handy steps or in the park or whe... See more
Deaths are up slightly again, but considering all the recent frolicking around bars in our new-found quasi-freedom, now I’m focusing on new contagions, and they’re up by 400 or so. Don’t say I didn’t warn anybody. The police came across several groups of teenagers and their “botellón”, which just means the kids all go to the supermarket and each buy a bottle of rum or whiskey or something, along with some mixers, and then they all sit around on some handy steps or in the park or wherever, with all their bottles in plastic bags, and drink the stuff and smoke dope. Not just here, all over Spain. Except the “botellón” is dodgy these days, because it’s not good for social distancing. One of the groups said they’d been caught in the rain, and that’s why they were sitting there in a street recess, ahem.

That Bilbao street I was talking about the other day … apparently some of the bars shut themselves down in the end because, even though they only had 50% of their outside seating available, people just took their drinks and stood around outside next to the tables, or chatting to the people at the tables, and suddenly there were dozens of people everywhere they couldn’t control, and the owners didn’t want to be fined. The mayor of Bilbao said the other day that the fines shouldn’t even be necessary, and it’s just a matter of common sense, which it is. And once people have had a few drinks, what do they do? They relax, that’s what, and in this country people are much more touchy-feely than in other places, and it’s only a matter of time before we’re back to square one.
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expressisverbis
 

Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
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Quarantining in style May 14

Seems the president of Madrid’s regional government (neither the Madrid government nor Madrid Town Hall are run by Sánchez's socialist party) has been spending the quarantine in an upmarket hotel. She was diagnosed with the bug a few days after the lockdown came into effect, but has been at the hotel with bug and without for two months now. Usual price 200 yucks a night, but they’ve docked it to only 80. They say she’s paying for it out of her own pocket. Pretty deep pocket. When she was ... See more
Seems the president of Madrid’s regional government (neither the Madrid government nor Madrid Town Hall are run by Sánchez's socialist party) has been spending the quarantine in an upmarket hotel. She was diagnosed with the bug a few days after the lockdown came into effect, but has been at the hotel with bug and without for two months now. Usual price 200 yucks a night, but they’ve docked it to only 80. They say she’s paying for it out of her own pocket. Pretty deep pocket. When she was an up-and-coming politician, I read she was living in 60 square metres somewhere (didn’t get on with her dad, apparently). That, however, is not the point now, because there’s some story about a lucrative contract with this hotel chain that’s been farmed out by the Madrid government. Which explains the knockdown price, presumably.

Now there's something I'm never sure about. Is it neither ... nor ... is, or are? Both sound fine to me. Tom?

The way I have it above, plural verb, sounds a teensy bit better to me.

[Edited at 2020-05-14 15:48 GMT]


[Edited at 2020-05-14 15:59 GMT]
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expressisverbis
 

Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
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Friday 15 May May 15

Deaths and contagions continue to rise amid the downscaling (I rest my case). Poor Basque President Urkullu got the nasty boo-hiss treatment when he visited one of Bilbao’s main hospitals the other day. “Less image, more health – out, out, out!” cried the staff in a vociferous heckling match mostly orchestrated by the main unions. It was a godsend to the Basque Country’s socialists after all the moaning and doom-mongering by his Basque Nationalist Party about the Socialist central gove... See more
Deaths and contagions continue to rise amid the downscaling (I rest my case). Poor Basque President Urkullu got the nasty boo-hiss treatment when he visited one of Bilbao’s main hospitals the other day. “Less image, more health – out, out, out!” cried the staff in a vociferous heckling match mostly orchestrated by the main unions. It was a godsend to the Basque Country’s socialists after all the moaning and doom-mongering by his Basque Nationalist Party about the Socialist central government swanning in from the start to take over regional operations without so much as a by-your-leave.

EAJ/PNV is a centre-right formation which has been governing Euskadi practically uninterrupted and practically single-handed too, since the mid-80s – think slightly less grass-rootsy Basque nationalists, with less screeching, more money and better clothes and haircuts. EAJ/PNV stands for Euskal Alderdi Jeltzale/Partido Nacionalista Vasco. They call them the “jeltzales”. You can perceive that “Euskal” is the Basque part, and then “Alderdi” means Party. "Jeltzale" doesn’t mean “Nationalist”, though. Well, not exactly. It’s actually the adjective from a slogan back in the year dot which evolved into an acronym, JELZ - Jaungoikoa Eta Lege Zaharrak, “God and the Old Laws”, which gives you an insight into the mindset. Euskera is a complicated but primitive language, which I’ll address in another post, maybe. Suffice it to say for the moment that God, "Jaungoikoa" (there are some alternative spellings as the language evolved down through the centuries, and in different areas of Euskadi), is a compound word meaning literally “the man above”. You’ve got to admit it’s curious.


[Edited at 2020-05-15 10:05 GMT]

[Edited at 2020-05-15 10:18 GMT]
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expressisverbis
 

Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
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Saturday 16 May May 16

Deaths down a bit, but contagions are up, 40 more than yesterday. Watch them climb even higher next week as incubation periods run their course. Watch supermarket prices shoot up too, but then they’d already made a start, from what I can see on my shopping tickets in the last few weeks.

My pessimistic eye catches many upbeat slogans around me, including a kid’s drawing of a rainbow inside our street door, saying “We’ll get there together”, but the more I think about it, t
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Deaths down a bit, but contagions are up, 40 more than yesterday. Watch them climb even higher next week as incubation periods run their course. Watch supermarket prices shoot up too, but then they’d already made a start, from what I can see on my shopping tickets in the last few weeks.

My pessimistic eye catches many upbeat slogans around me, including a kid’s drawing of a rainbow inside our street door, saying “We’ll get there together”, but the more I think about it, the more I reckon Covid-19, or maybe its strains, is here to stay. State TV is littered with hopeful doo-dah plink-plink-plink tunes and scenes of happy people in the same vein, “We’ll hug each other again”, “We’ll have that cold beer again”, “We’ll go to the cinema again”, “We’ll have our yoga class again”, “We’ll meet again” etc . I’m not so sure.

Then there's the shop on this very street with a huge felt-tipped message on the window, “Let's take care of our health and everything will be fine”. Which sounds encouraging, but on the other hand this is one of the “Tabacalera” state smoking materials outlets, none of which, curiously, have been closed during this health crisis. Along with food and drink and pharmacies, they were classified as essential establishments. Not that it would have bothered people unduly if they’d pulled down the shutters because, even though the bars and restaurants were closed too until only a few days ago, most newspaper kiosks sell cigarettes as well, as a sideline. Still, it’s always more pleasant to have a vast shelved array of packets of cigarettes, loose tobacco, ciggie papers for rolling it, with or without other substances, lighters with the Basque flag, the Athletic Bilbao colours, Sponge Bob or Michael Jackson on them.


[Edited at 2020-05-16 10:46 GMT]
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expressisverbis
 

expressisverbis
Portugal
Local time: 18:00
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A glimpse of hope May 16

Mervyn Henderson wrote:

My pessimistic eye catches many upbeat slogans around me, including a kid’s drawing of a rainbow inside our street door, saying “We’ll get there together”, but the more I think about it, the more I reckon Covid-19, or maybe its strains, is here to stay. State TV is littered with hopeful doo-dah plink-plink-plink tunes and scenes of happy people in the same vein, “We’ll hug each other again”, “We’ll have that cold beer again”, “We’ll go to the cinema again”, “We’ll have our yoga class again”, “We’ll meet again” etc . I’m not so sure.



[Edited at 2020-05-16 10:46 GMT]


We should be confident and optimistic!
The curve seems to have stabilised.
While it is very painful and heartbreaking that people continue to die from this monster, we can see a decrease in cases these past weeks.
The other day, while working, I read something, a kind of a "refrán" in Spanish: "si lo que vives no te gusta, acéptalo y pasará rápidamente".
I don't like the way I am living since this pandemic, but I am accepting this "new normality" life in the hope that coronavirus will come to an end... soon!


 

Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
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Sunday 17 May May 17

Only 102 deaths yesterday, but contagions up a little. And crime’s up as well, but then obviously it had plummeted in the last couple of months. Depends what you mean by crime, too – there I meant theft, affrays in the street and the like. Yesterday’s rag had a photo of two ertzainas handcuffing an offender in a black T-shirt and dark trousers against a white wall, for example. Except I remember a photo from months ago with two ertzainas handcuffing a man in a black T-shirt and dark trouse... See more
Only 102 deaths yesterday, but contagions up a little. And crime’s up as well, but then obviously it had plummeted in the last couple of months. Depends what you mean by crime, too – there I meant theft, affrays in the street and the like. Yesterday’s rag had a photo of two ertzainas handcuffing an offender in a black T-shirt and dark trousers against a white wall, for example. Except I remember a photo from months ago with two ertzainas handcuffing a man in a black T-shirt and dark trousers against a white wall, and either this bloke never changes his clothes and always returns to the scene of the crime to get himself arrested in the same place by the same policemen, or it’s the same photo. Anyway, there’s a lot more theft and robbery going on out there.

But there are other crimes. Domestic violence has soared, as being cooped up for most of the day with the family and the youngsters doesn’t improve the mood of anyone predisposed to snarl and growl and shout and give the spouse a tremendous kicking just because it’s Wednesday. Now largely deprived of the privacy of phone calls, a few weeks ago victims who couldn’t take it any more were being advised to nip into the pharmacy or supermarket and tell anyone who could report it properly on their behalf. Me, I mostly just cower in the kitchen, keep my head down, serve the food with trembling hand and hope it won’t be thrown at the wall in disgust. Never a good sign.

Which reminds me of an amusing story. Not that the foregoing is an amusing topic, but have you never been in one of those situations which starts off all serious, and then deteriorates into a bit of a giggle? You might be at a funeral, say, and at a funeral, necessarily, people remember the person and anecdotes various, so there you might be, remembering old Fred opening a can of lager which had been shaken around a bit, and spraying beer all around himself, and so a little chuckle escapes you, but you look up to find Fred’s widow all dressed in black, those eyes edged with tears glaring angrily at you from the graveside.

Well, that never actually happened to me as such. What did happen to me was when I was a teenager working at a restaurant on the Cold, Wet and Rainy Rock. It was run by 7 or 8 brothers and sisters, and their parents lived in the old house beside it, where the patriarch died. He’d been dying for years, though, and I heard that he’d been a member of the old IRA, and had been shot by the police back in the day, something he never really recovered from. It was a well-known Republican family, especially since our region wasn’t really that way inclined, and in fact the restaurant got bombed once for that reason, if you can call it a reason, back in the 70s.

I was slicing my onions out in the back when one of the sisters asked me if I’d like to see her father up in the house. My first impulse was to say “Why? He’s dead, isn’t he?”, but there was something about the way she stood there with hands clasped before her, and I thought “Well, Catholics are like that, aren’t they, laying out the corpse, vigil, wake, and all”. So up I went, and there he was lying on the bed in his black suit and tie, with the rosary beads between his fingers. A man and a woman were standing there looking at him, and the woman suddenly said, “Ach, doesn’t he look great, sure? Just look at him, lying there all peaceful, like. That wee holiday must have done him a world of good.” Well, I had to leave the room before I burst out laughing. Later on one of the brothers I worked with very closely brought down a whole case of beer for me and two or three others to drink as we worked.

Actually, that wasn’t the amusing story either. It’s the next bit that’s the serious-becoming-comical story. I felt I had to put a bit of space between the domestic violence part and this part, just to make it crystal clear that I don’t find domestic violence remotely funny. And I don’t …

A friend in England arranged an interpreting gig for me once between a feminist organisation here and a similar organisation in the green and pleasant land. My brief was to pick up the four women from their hotel in Bilbao, take them to their counterparts’ offices and do any interpreting that was necessary. I got on well with the Englishwomen during the walk there, although I must admit I was aware of being a mere man among a gaggle of wimmin about to meet another gaggle of wimmin, and so I was watching my step with sexist language and all that. In fact, at one point I remember I used the word “businessmen”, and one of them gently corrected me by saying “… or businesswomen”, but they were friendly enough.

At the office, though, the friendliness screeched to a halt. A tall, unfriendly, forbidding woman opened the door. I introduced everyone, and she said “Amaia, our president [not her real name – this is a real organisation which often appears in local and even national media, so I’m not identifying anyone], isn’t here yet, but she will be here shortly.” I translated all this, and then she showed us around the office. There was a door with Amaia’s name on it, and she said, “This is Amaia our president’s office”, and I translated that too. Then she pointed to a photo on the wall. “This is Amaia, our president, receiving an award.” I translated that too. She pointed to another. “This is Amaia, our president, making a speech.” I translated that too. She picked up a mounted figurine. “This is the award given to Amaia, our president.” I translated that too, but I was starting to feel the beginnings of a smile playing around my lips, what with all the references to “Amaia, our president”. I stole a glance at the Englishwomen, and I was relieved to see a few raised eyebrows and quizzical expressions among them, too, so I knew it wasn’t just me.

The buzzer went from downstairs. “Ah, that’ll be Amaia, our president,” said the woman. This time I merely nodded at her, and nodded at the others. The woman frowned. “Go on,” she said, “tell them. Tell them that’s Amaia, our president, downstairs.” As you may have surmised, the words “Amaia” and “presidenta” didn’t really require any translation at all by this stage, especially since they were practically the only words being said. Plus, I was beginning to see some shoulders heaving slightly among the Englishwomen and I was doing my best not to grin, but I translated it too. The Englishwomen were all smiling with knitted brows by now.

The office door buzzer went. “That will be Amaia, our president,” announced the tall second-in-command. The other women and myself were beginning to giggle openly as I translated that too. The door opened to reveal a very, very, very short woman framed in the doorway. She stepped inside, surveyed us all, and said “Good morning. I am Amaia, the president.” Well. I could hear one of the English contingent tittering very, very quietly next to me, and I was keeping my mouth shut as best I could so that I didn’t lose it completely.

She looked at me in what I can only describe as mild disgust. As I was standing there all tight-lipped, saying not one word to play safe, she said “You’re the interpreter, aren’t you? Well, tell them, tell them who I am. I am Amaia, the president.” All I could do was smile broadly because otherwise I’d have laughed in her face, and I had only just started on what must have been my tenth “Amaia, the president” translation when the tittering beside me developed into a guffaw, and that set me off too, and then the others started in. It was so embarrassing. The look of outrage and anger on Amaia’s face at five foreigners laughing at her for no apparent reason.

At that point another girl appeared and told Amaia that she could do all the translations that morning, so Amaia jumped at the chance and said I could leave, and come back in the afternoon to take the Englishwomen on a culture trip around the city. I didn’t care, because I was getting paid for the day no matter what. I laughed all day long afterwards – even when I met up with the English feminists again in the afternoon, they were still shaking with laughter too.


[Edited at 2020-05-17 10:10 GMT]
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Chris S
 

Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
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Monday 18 May May 18

“No more time restrictions for villages in Bizkaia with populations under 1,000”, crows the headline. So it looks like they can knock themselves out in the sticks round about here. Deaths in Spain yesterday fell below the psychological barrier of 100, and only 7 of them in the Basque Country. Contagion seems to be falling as well. For the moment.

I’ve been counting during my morning runs, trying to come up with a vague percentage of masks + gloves being used by the local popul
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“No more time restrictions for villages in Bizkaia with populations under 1,000”, crows the headline. So it looks like they can knock themselves out in the sticks round about here. Deaths in Spain yesterday fell below the psychological barrier of 100, and only 7 of them in the Basque Country. Contagion seems to be falling as well. For the moment.

I’ve been counting during my morning runs, trying to come up with a vague percentage of masks + gloves being used by the local population. I feel like a bit of a waz myself running with both gloves and a mask, but really I only use the gloves because I also take down the rubbish before I start my run, which would theoretically necessitate only one glove, but I’d look even dafter with just one, and also to separate the fractions and put them in the different containers I need both of them, and also to buy the newspaper at the end. I did take them off once after getting shot of the rubbish, putting them in my pocket to run, but I only had to put them on again for the newspaper, opening and closing doors etc. But I digress. I reckon maybe 2 people out of 5 wear a mask, and maybe 1 in 5 the gloves. Then again, a lot of those people are simply out walking in the 6-10 am slot, and maybe they took out the rubbish the night before, and don’t buy anything while they’re out.

Down in Madrid they’re none too happy at being excluded for another week or so from Downscaling Phase 1, so they’ve been out demonstrating with their Spanish flags and “We want freedom” placards, mostly in the well-to-do Salamanca district of the city, where people presumably aren’t too used to demos, but other places too. Those placards, incidentally, remind me of the placards seen at demos in Barcelona over the last few years, although for different reasons.

So, whereas elsewhere the workers organise demonstrations because they have nowhere to get money to spend due to the lockdown, others organise demonstrations because they have nowhere to spend their money due to the lockdown. Bad news for Señor S and his government, under attack from both left and right.
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expressisverbis
 

Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
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Euskera May 18

I said before I’d give you a little introduction to the Basque language, Euskera, so here it is. Not that I claim to be an expert, so any fluent Basque speakers out there should feel free to correct me.

I had been in the Basque Country for about 7 years before I even thought about learning Euskera. Most of the academies here offer 2 hours per day, 5 days a week, although you can do more, or less, but 2 hours a day is standard. My first “from-scratch” class had about 8 or 9 oth
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I said before I’d give you a little introduction to the Basque language, Euskera, so here it is. Not that I claim to be an expert, so any fluent Basque speakers out there should feel free to correct me.

I had been in the Basque Country for about 7 years before I even thought about learning Euskera. Most of the academies here offer 2 hours per day, 5 days a week, although you can do more, or less, but 2 hours a day is standard. My first “from-scratch” class had about 8 or 9 other students of all ages, between 18 and 50-60 years old. Some people were doing it because they were unemployed and got Basque Government grants to do it, others needed it for their jobs in local government, and others like me were doing it out of interest, a challenge, and also simply because I was living in Euskadi.

After we’d been at it for a month or so, talking to the others (in Spanish) in the class over a glass of wine in the bar afterwards, I said that it was all very well that we had met up in Basque class, but that outside our classes Spanish would still be our language of choice for communication purposes. How wrong I was! After only 3 or 4 months, we would still go to the bar for a drink afterwards to discuss our homework or what we had learned that day, but by now we were discussing it in Basque. It helped that most of the watering holes around that area were run and frequented by Basque speakers.

The first thing I noticed about Basque is that it's all the other way round and, a little like German, the verbs are mostly left until the end of the sentence. Like German, it must be a nightmare to interpret. But Basque takes more than one step in that direction. One easy sentence as an example to demonstrate that it’s totally inverted with regard to English, or Spanish, is “I ate an apple” – “Sagar bat jan nuen”, literally “Apple an ate I”. There’s a lot more of that, too, in clauses – “the man who gave me the apple” goes something like “the apple gave to me who the man”.

I did German up to O level, so I knew about the way the Germans string word after word together to make long compound words such as Geschwindigkeitsbeschränkungen (hope I got that right – speed limits, as I remember), and Basque does that too, but it sticks in prefixes, suffixes and even infixes. The equivalent of “of”, “a/an”, “for”, “since”, “because” etc. are made part of the same word at the beginning, in the middle or at the end. German translators know there can be a considerable difference in source and target word count in their combination – they'll know much better than me how much – but I’ve seen as much as 40% more words in English translations from Basque.

This is exacerbated further by a frighteningly complicated verb system. There are so many verb endings for so many scenarios, and Basque crams so much information into just a few letters. Je te le donne, I give you it (both 4 words) translate as “ematen dizut”, only 2 words. That “dizut” is made up of three parts, what they call “nor-nori-nork”, or what-to whom-who, a mark for what’s given, followed by a mark for the givee, followed by a mark for the giver, “di-zu-t”. And then, just to make it a little harder, they have some quite different endings for all persons when it’s a simple object-subject phrase such as “she loves you”. And then the subjunctive is just too scary to mention.

There’s no V in Basque, no Y and no C, either, all respectively replaced by B, I and K. This province, Vizcaya, is “Bizkaia” in Basque for that reason. Unlike Spanish (well, most parts of Spain), the Z is pronounced like an S, and an S is mostly pronounced SH. Some words which would have a hard C in Spanish, say, “coronavirus”, would have a K in Basque, “koronabirus”, the plural of a noun is denoted by a K at the end, AND any of those “giver” nouns also take a K at the end. Three reasons why a passage in Basque is littered with all those Ks.

E.g. https://www.berria.eus/



[Edited at 2020-05-18 11:07 GMT]

[Edited at 2020-05-18 11:28 GMT]

[Edited at 2020-05-18 17:04 GMT]

[Edited at 2020-05-18 17:06 GMT]
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expressisverbis
Christel Zipfel
 

expressisverbis
Portugal
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Betacism May 18

Mervyn Henderson wrote:

There’s no V in Basque, no Y and no C, either, all respectively replaced by B, I and K. This province, Vizcaya, is “Bizkaia” in Basque for that reason. Unlike Spanish (well, most parts of Spain), the Z is pronounced like an S, and an S is mostly pronounced SH. Some words which would have a C in Spanish, say, “coronavirus”, would have a K in Basque, “koronabirus”, the plural of a noun is denoted by a K at the end, AND any of those “giver” nouns also take a K at the end. Three reasons why a passage in Basque is littered with all those Ks.



[Edited at 2020-05-18 11:07 GMT]

[Edited at 2020-05-18 11:28 GMT]


I loved this short introduction to Euskara!
And I became aware of my "Basque origins"!
I'm just kidding
Portuguese has both consonants (V and B), but we are known for using what we call in Linguistics the "Betacism", which means changing the V into a B.
This occurs in Northern Portugal only, maybe due to the geographic and linguistic proximity between Spain and Portugal, and the lovely Galician-Portuguese (medieval language spoken in Galicia and northern Portugal).
We can see these linguistic phenomena in other languages with other consonants, for ex., in Arabic with the P and B (so "Peugeot" sounds like a beautiful "Bijoux", and the same goes for V and F... and a word came into my mind now that can be written with a V and/or a F ("alcova/alcofa") which means "carrycot".




[Edited at 2020-05-18 16:21 GMT]


Mervyn Henderson
 

Anthony Keily
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Punks and K May 19

Spanish punks also turned all hard "c" sounds into K, as in the Madrid punk band Kaka de Luxe (Alaska was a member). When I lived in Barcelona in the 80s/90s, punks would deturn metro maps so Barcelona read "Karcelona" and the metro stop Roquetes became KRoquetes (although strictly speaking it should probably have become Kroketes).

Nothing to do with K, but the anti-Olympic punk slogan was: N O O O
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Spanish punks also turned all hard "c" sounds into K, as in the Madrid punk band Kaka de Luxe (Alaska was a member). When I lived in Barcelona in the 80s/90s, punks would deturn metro maps so Barcelona read "Karcelona" and the metro stop Roquetes became KRoquetes (although strictly speaking it should probably have become Kroketes).

Nothing to do with K, but the anti-Olympic punk slogan was: N O O O
O O !
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Anthony Keily
Local time: 19:00
Miembro
italiano al inglés
+ ...
Realigned May 19

The punks' anti-Olympic slogan was sabotaged by Proz automatic alignment: the bottom two "O"s are supposed to line up with the spaces between the top three "O"s to make the Olympic rings.

 

Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
España
Local time: 19:00
Miembro
español al inglés
+ ...
PERSONA QUE INICIÓ LA HEBRA
Barcelona - @Anthony May 19

Crikey, everyone seems to have lived in Barcelona in the 80s/90s. I worked in the dire but definitely educational absinthe dive Café Marsella on Sant Pau before, during and after those NOOOOO Olympics. Then I entered the shiny happy world of translation. Sometimes I think the Marsella was much simpler. But it was much simpler in every sense.

As for the K, it was everywhere at one point. Anarkía, Kaos, Okupa, all the lefties were gagging to use the K. Deputy PM Pablo Iglesias (one
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Crikey, everyone seems to have lived in Barcelona in the 80s/90s. I worked in the dire but definitely educational absinthe dive Café Marsella on Sant Pau before, during and after those NOOOOO Olympics. Then I entered the shiny happy world of translation. Sometimes I think the Marsella was much simpler. But it was much simpler in every sense.

As for the K, it was everywhere at one point. Anarkía, Kaos, Okupa, all the lefties were gagging to use the K. Deputy PM Pablo Iglesias (one of the four, is it?, deputy PMs - how many deputies do you need?) used to rant against the government on a TV show called La Tuerka.



[Edited at 2020-05-19 12:36 GMT]

[Edited at 2020-05-19 14:39 GMT]
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Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
España
Local time: 19:00
Miembro
español al inglés
+ ...
PERSONA QUE INICIÓ LA HEBRA
Tuesday 19 May May 19

Nothing to say today, really. Well, OK, I have - you know you're getting older when you start yearning for the good old days. Two minor examples:

I bought some toothpaste, and didn't take a proper look at what I was buying, because if I stopped to consider the contents and merits and advantages of all the different brands of toothpaste and all the different types I'd be there all day, and that's just the toothpaste, never mind the washing powder, the jam, the nuts, the cereals, the
... See more
Nothing to say today, really. Well, OK, I have - you know you're getting older when you start yearning for the good old days. Two minor examples:

I bought some toothpaste, and didn't take a proper look at what I was buying, because if I stopped to consider the contents and merits and advantages of all the different brands of toothpaste and all the different types I'd be there all day, and that's just the toothpaste, never mind the washing powder, the jam, the nuts, the cereals, the chickpeas and the rest. It was only when I squeezed it out that I saw it was black. My first thought, and I know it sounds stupid now, but at the time it was what I thought, was that the toothpaste was way past its sell-by date, but then I looked at the tube, and it said "Charcoal - gentle mineral massage" or something or other. So you brush your teeth and it's all greyish initially, but that recedes after a bit of brushing. But ... charcoal toothpaste?

Not that they're a completely new thing to me because I've been wearing them for ages, but why do you need an "L" and an "R" printed on those short sport socks, the ones that barely clear the height of the trainer so it looks as if you aren't wearing any socks down there? The answer is that, if you put the L sock on the right foot and the R sock on the left, they kind of fit, sort of, if you don't mind an odd-looking pinch on the big toes. But you don't actually need to read the L and the R, because it's still obvious from looking at them which is which. But how come I spent decades with perfectly interchangeable socks, and now I have to think about it? Is this what they mean by innovation? How is innovation helping me here if I have to think a smidgeon more, whereas before there was nothing to think about? Why couldn't they just leave the socks alone?





[Edited at 2020-05-19 15:54 GMT]
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Jennifer Forbes
expressisverbis
 
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